Marble Side Tables

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Marble Side Tables

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If you need a side table with substance, there’s nothing like a marble side table. Whether you opt for antique marble end tables with a Neoclassical feel, or a pair of modernist plinth-style marble tables, marble side tables are perfect for elevating a room. Here at Chairish, we curate one of the internet’s most incredible selections of marble side tables. Sourced from thousands of vintage and modernist dealers located all over the U.S. and Europe, our collection includes over a thousand different styles and models. Discover masterpiece-grade tables from makers like Edward Wormley and Phillip Lloyd Powell, as well as more affordable, gently-loved designs from accessible Mid-Century brands like American of Martinsville. For something truly statement-making, check out our collection of postmodern marble tables, including designs by the illustrious Angelo Mangiarotti. Explore terrazzo marble tables and carrara marble tables as well as red and pink marble tables. Traditionalists will also find no shortage of options available. Shop antique French Louis marble top side table as well as directoire and gueridon-style tables. As a bonus, every item you see on the site has been hand-vetted by our in-house style team who is well-versed in the marble styles that make top designers swoon. Losing your marbles yet? Then, let's get shopping!

What Different Kinds of Marble Can Marble Side Tables Be Made Of?

Marble variations number in the hundreds, believe it or not. So the list below is an extremely abbreviated look at the types of marble used for side tables. No matter what kind of marble you opt for, it’s worth noting that marble is a porous material that will hold onto stains. So especially if you have a white marble side table, watch out for those red wine rings!

Carrara Marble Side Tables

Perhaps the most commonly used marble for furniture, Carrara marble derives from Tuscany. While Carrara marble is traditionally thought of as being white, it can also be bluish or grayish in color. It typically possesses linear veining that has a softly blurred appearance. In contrast to Calacatta marble, which showcases a similar color story to Carrara, Carrara is more subtly patterned.

Calacatta Marble Side Tables

Also originating in Italy, Calacatta marble is understood to be more dramatic in appearance than Carrara. For one, Calacatta marble side tables tend to be purer white than Carrara which leads to higher contrast veining. Secondly, Calacatta’s veining is typically considered to be larger-scale. Calacatta is also more likely to feature deep-gray-almost-black and gold veining.

Black Marble Side Tables

Black marble side tables will generally be one of two black marbles: Levadia marble or Nero Marquina marble. Nero Marquina marble is more common and originates in the Basque Country of Spain. It is a bottomless black stone scrawled with bright white veins. Depending on the particular slab, these white veins can be so plentiful that they almost overwhelm the black background.

Pink Marble Side Tables

Pink marble side tables may be among some of the hardest-to-find marble side tables, hence they’re also among the most coveted. Pink marble variations are plentiful, but Rosa Portugués is perhaps the most widely used pink marble. Rosa Portugués can vary in hue from terracotta pink to or grayish-cast pinks. Its veining is usually longitudinal and black or brown in color.

Are Travertine Side Tables Considered Marble Side Tables?

Although travertine and marble are both types of limestone, they feature different chemical makeups and therefore are considered different stones. That said, both began their lives as limestone that underwent a metamorphosis due to direct exposure to drastically high pressures and temperatures. Typically, travertine has experienced additional heat and pressure, hence, leading to its different appearance. Although travertine may appear similar to marble at first glance, it’ surface features more a striated pattern than veined pattern. It is also not as smooth and often displays pits, pockmarks, and troughs.