Sectional Sofas

New, Vintage and Antique Sectional Sofas

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Sectional Sofas

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There’s no faster way to take a room from ho-hum to a whole lot of fun quite like a vintage sectional. If you’re in the market for a vintage sectional sofa that combines comfort and style in spades, don’t hesitate to make Chairish ground zero for your hunt. We carry hundreds of vintage sectional couch designs, all in one easy-to-shop place. Whether you’re on the hunt for a vintage modular sofa from a Mid-Century Modern maverick like Harvey Probber or Edward Wormley, or you’re more drawn to the idea of a Postmodern serpentine sectional from a designer like Milo Baughman, chances are you’ll find something to fit the bill within our collection of vintage sectional sofas for sale.

Shop an Expertly Curated Edit of Vintage Sectional Sofas

Need a vintage sectional sofa in a particular colorway, such as white, lavender, or pink? Use our color filters to find an iconic design in your exact-needed hue. You can also shop our collection of sectionals for sale by style, price, and even size. When you finally do find the perfect sectional to call your own, whether it be a classic from DeSede, Roche Bobois, or Ligne Roset—don’t worry about long lead times or shipping. That's right, say hello to near-instant gratification! Because we work primarily with vintage dealers, the bulk of our vintage sectional sofa collection is in stock and ready to ship today. We also handle all of the shipping and logistics, and we'll book your sectional couch with a trusted white glove shipper. What does that mean for you? It means you can start relaxing before your brand new vintage sectional even arrives!

Explore a Wide Array of Sectional Configurations

L-Shape

Most used sectionals showcase an L-shape. Easily achievable by merging two benches at a 90-degree angle, or setting a bench perpendicular to a chaise, the L is ideal for most spaces. It can easily hug two walls or define a more intimate conversation area within a larger space (like an open living room-dining room combo). Something to keep in mind: when shopping for a vintage L-shape sectional, terms like right arm-facing or left arm-facing will be used to define specifics like what side the sectional’s chaise is located on. In example, if an item is tagged “Right arm-facing,” it means that when you are standing in front of the sofa, facing it directly, the arm is on your right side.

U-Shape

If scoring the corner horseshoe-shaped booth at your favorite Italian joint fills you with joy, a U-shape sectional might be your best bet. Undeniably intimate, a U-shape sectional can consist of anything from an elegantly curved sofa, or a boxy, modular-like structure that features two 90-degree turns (or three rows of seating). Because both of these sofa types offer the option for two people to sit directly across from one another, they’re ideal for spaces where cultivating conversation is priority.

Modular Build-a-Sofa

Let’s face it, a vintage sectional is an investment. It’s a piece you’ve likely considered long and hard, yet—for better or worse—that doesn’t mean you’ll never tire of it. Our solution? A modular sectional.

Consisting of soft blocks or cushions that can be shifted to create a series of formations, modular sofas are perfect for those who crave spontaneity. Indulge in a right-facing sectional one day and a left-facing the next. While modular furniture dates back as far as the early 20th Century, it’s American designer Harvey Probber who’s credited with introducing modular seating in the 1940s. Early prototypes of Probber’s featured flat, ottoman-like seats and rectangular block pillows that could be moved atop the ottomans to create backs and arms. When the 1970s ushered in an era of general bohemia mania, these floor-skimming models became the unquestionable poster child.